Is it safe to give your baby someone else’s breast milk?

The AAP does not encourage using informally shared breast milk, citing the risks of spreading disease. It can also expose an infant to medications, alcohol, drugs, or other contaminants.

What happens if a baby drinks another woman’s breast milk?

“While moms who offer their milk to another mama have good intentions, it is possible to pass diseases through breast milk.” After all, even though it might have more nutrients, the breast milk won’t be pasteurized, so you could be putting your baby at risk for contracting bacteria, diseases, or viruses.

Can you give your baby another woman’s breast milk?

Wet-nursing or cross-nursing is the act of breastfeeding someone’s else’s child. A wet nurse may have a healthy breast milk supply from breastfeeding her own child, or she may stimulate a supply of breast milk specifically for another woman’s child. … Having a healthy baby nursing at the breast will do just that.

Is it safe to use a Friends breast milk?

However, breast milk shared by friends or bought through the internet is unlikely to have been collected, processed, tested or stored in a way that reduces risks to a baby. This kind of donated breast milk could contain: Bacterial growth and contamination with bacteria that could cause infection.

Can you breastfeed a baby that’s not yours?

Yes, you can breastfeed a baby to whom you did not give birth. In fact, breastfeeding an adopted baby is recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics. It is even possible to breastfeed if you have never been pregnant or have reached menopause.

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Can you use someone else’s breast pump?

Only breast pumps that are designed for multiple users should be used by more than one person. With the exception of multiple user pumps, the FDA considers breast pumps to be single-user devices. … Breast pumps that are reused by different mothers can carry infectious particles, which can make you or your baby sick.

Can breast milk carry diseases?

Three viruses (CMV, HIV, and HTLV-I) frequently cause infection or disease as a result of breast-milk transmission. Reasonable guidelines have been pro-posed for when and how to avoid breast milk in the case of maternal infection.