What do you do when your baby won’t breastfeed?

How can I force my baby to breastfeed?

Give him your milk

Expressing your milk by hand or pump will stimulate your breasts to make milk. Aim to express as often as your baby would be feeding, about 8–12 times in 24 hours. Your expressed milk can be offered by spoon, cup or syringe while you both learn how to breastfeed.

Why is my baby fighting my breast?

Sometimes babies will refuse or fuss at a breast when the let-down is slower or too forceful, or the supply a bit lower. They in turn will prefer the side which lets down more/less quickly and in which the supply is more bountiful. See also: Lopsided!

Why does my baby cry when I try to breastfeed?

Oversupply or fast flow

When your baby is having trouble managing your flow, they will often cry in protest. The milk may be coming out so quickly and abundantly — sometimes spraying down their throat — and they may not be able to coordinate breathing and suckling, which can make them quite upset.

Why does my baby pull away and cry while breastfeeding?

Babies will often fuss, cry, or pull away from the breast when they need to burp. A fast flow of milk can exacerbate this. They can also swallow more air when they’re fussy, or gulp down milk faster than normal if they’re over-hungry.

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Why is my baby refusing my right breast?

A newborn may reject one breast because it’s harder to latch on to for some reason. The rejected breast may be more engorged or have a difference in the nipple, for example. An older baby may reject one breast because it has a low milk supply or a slower flow or letdown than the other breast.

Why does my baby turn his head while nursing?

It just means that the baby isn’t getting as much milk as she would like at that moment. A baby popping on and off for this reason tends to bury her head into the breast, then yank back with the nipple still in her mouth before popping off and crying.